Beginnings

Yarra Glen is a typical close-knit small town with a population about 3500. It's not unusual for friends to discuss matters concerning the town and surrounding district. Public meetings held in the community after the February 2009 Black Saturday bush fires highlighted men's physical and mental health as a matter of concern.

And so it was that the thought of establishing a local Men's Shed germinated. It didn't take long before a nucleus of motivated locals organised the inaugural meeting on 15 September 2010 to set the ball rolling.

In no time it seems, location for new premises was found and approved, equipment donated, sponsors established, initial fund raising plans crystallised, building plans drawn up  and lodged with the local Shire Council, building grant applications lodged, Incorporation legalities finalised and a Community Service Trailer (a.k.a. "Shed On Wheels") fully stocked with tools received as a donation from the Portland Baptist Church.

Early in 2012 steps were taken to create our own website. It is as you see it now. Over time it will grow as more features are added.

Building our generous 220 square metre extension to the Gary Cooper Pavilion in the recreational precinct of the town was started April 2013.

Even though there were some minor tasks in the fit-out yet to be done, in October 2013 it was completed to a stage which allowed the doors to be opened and members to begin working on projects. The official opening ceremony took place on 4 October 2014. Since then, Committee and members are actively involved in fund raising activities, community projects, training workshops and the all important weekly "Wednesday Coffee Mornings".

The future of the group is exciting indeed!

Mission Statement

The Yarra Glen and District Men's Shed aims to provide

  • a woodworking, metalworking, small machinery repair, hobby workshop facility and 'drop-in' centre for men of all ages.
     
  • a friendly and relaxed environment where members can enjoy the company of others and share skills while working on personal or community projects - an ideal 'personal shed substitute'.
     
  • a physical home maintenance help to the frail and elderly of the district in genuine need.
     
  • facilities to those who, because of various reasons, may no longer have access to their own 'shed' as well as to those who do.
     
  • a facility where school children may complete their projects in a mentored environment.
     
  • a venue to which local and district "aged-care" residents can be bused, thus allowing them an outing and offering a chance to tinker. Wheelchair access is available.  

Every bloke needs a shed - it's an Australian ideal!